Dogman vs Rigger What’s the difference
We answer the question: What is the difference between a dogman and a rigger?

This post was originally written by Ryan Graham from Work Safety QLD and posted on Falcon Cranes website. 

When working with cranes, the crane operator is just one part of the team. A dogman, sometimes called a dogger, is essential in assisting the crane operator in slinging loads and directing the crane to land loads safely, as well as inspecting lifting gear to determine that it is safe to use.

A rigger is also able to carry out these responsibilities but with extra skills for carrying out particular kinds of rigging work. There are three classes of rigging licenses, each with its own type of work that can be performed.

The type of licence you’ll need will depend on the specific work needed.

Dogman duties:

A Dogman or “dogger” is a specialist in correctly slinging and directing loads handled by cranes. A Dogman must hold a “DG” High Risk Work Licence. The Dogman selects the best equipment to sling a certain load based on mass and centre of gravity. 

In addition they perform the role of directing the crane operator whilst the load is out of the view of the operator using a combination of radio communication, whistles and hand signals. Often, the crane operator will work with a team of dogmen, for example: one on the ground to attach the load and another on top of the building to remove it. 

Rigger duties:

A rigger can perform all of the same duties that a Dogman can perform, as well as more advanced rigging techniques based on the type of rigger licence they have. The type of work that can be performed by each kind of rigger is as following:

Basic Rigging (RB):

  • Dogman duties
  • Erecting of structural steel and materials
  • Placement of pre-cast concrete members of a structure
  • Installation of static lines, safety nets and work platforms for mast climbers
  • Cantilevered crane loading platforms

Intermediate rigging – RI:

  • All Basic Rigging duties
  • rigging of cranes, conveyors, dredges and excavators
  • Erecting of tilt-slabs and precast concrete panels
  • Dual-crane lifts
  • Demolition

Advanced rigging – RA:

  •  All Intermediate rigging duties
  • Rigging of specialised materials, such as:
    • Gin poles
    • Shear legs
    • Flying foxes
    • Guyed derricks; and
    • Guyed structures
  • Erecting of suspended scaffolds and fabricated hung scaffolds.

For more information, see the Qld Government licensing information:

https://www.worksafe.qld.gov.au/licensing-and-registrations/work-health-and-safety-licences/what-licence-do-i-need/rigger-and-dogger

You can view the original post written by Ryan Graham from Work Safety QLD posted on Falcon Cranes website here

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